FAQ Illinois


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Depending on where you live, you may be able to save money by switching energy suppliers.

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Just like you shop for any household item, you can shop for your electricity to find the best deal and the best service for your needs. Remember, saving just one cent per kWh could translate into several hundred dollars in savings, depending on usage. Competitive offers may not be available in all areas.

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Your electric supplier is the company that provides your electric generation service. In many states, you have the power to choose your electric supplier.

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There are three parts to your electric service: generation, transmission and distribution. Generation is the production of electricity. Transmission is the movement of that electricity from where it is produced to a local distribution system. Distribution is the delivery of electricity to your home or business. When you shop for an electric supplier, you are choosing the company that generates your electricity. For most electric customers who select a new supplier, transmission costs will also be included in the charges from your new supplier. The electric utility that distributes your electricity will remain the same.

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Only consumers living in deregulated areas are able to shop for an electricity or gas supplier. Competitive offers may not be available in all areas.

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If you choose a new electric supplier, the quality, reliability, and maintenance of your electric service will not change. Your current electric utility will continue to provide the same transmission and distribution service. And electric suppliers must be licensed by the Public Utility Commission (PUC) to do business.

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The effective date of your choice depends on your next meter read date and can take 1-2 billing cycles.

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The price to compare (PTC) is the price per kilowatt hour (kWh) your electric distribution company will charge. As you shop for electricity, ask competitive suppliers to provide you with a PTC so that you can make an apples-to-apples comparison on price for the generation portion of your bill. Be sure to ask how long the price is effective and verify if taxes or other fees are included in the PTC.

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In most cases, you should be able to receive a single monthly bill from your electric utility. However, some suppliers might want to bill you separately. In this case, you would receive two bills, one from your electric utility and one from the supplier.

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This depends on the agreement you have with your current supplier. Review your agreement with your current supplier to see if there are any penalties for cancellation. If you are not sure, call your current supplier. Be sure to ask your new supplier if they have any fees or penalties for cancelling or switching service.

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Not if you are a residential customer. However, you may want to ask if the supplier offers an advanced meter. These meters allow you to record your electric use during specific time periods, which could help you reduce energy use and benefit from special time-of-day discounts and other cost savings.

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You will still call your electric utility about power outages and repairs.

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If you have a question about the generation charges, contact your electric supplier. Otherwise, you should continue to contact your electric utility to report outages and request repairs.

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No. the utilities encourage their customers to choose an electric supplier to help lower energy costs.

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Most people choose an electric supplier to lower their cost for electricity. Some business customers have chosen an electric supplier for the added services they offer such as energy management and conservation/energy efficiency services.

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In most instances your utility will bill you for the electricity you purchase from an electric supplier. So, you will continue to receive one electric bill.

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Yes most electricity suppliers offer choices to their consumers for purchasing electricity from renewable and non renewable electricity sources.